The Grasshopper King, wordled

Via Crooked Timber I learned about Wordle, the application that takes any chunk of text and produces a beautiful graphic representation of the most common words therein, sized according to their frequency. So here’s The Grasshopper King:

I especially like the tiny “asked” inside the “d” of “said.” I think that’s just good luck; it would be impressive if Wordle knew enough to make up little figures of this kind.

I wonder if most prose fiction would come out looking pretty much alike, apart from the names of characters? The predominance of “said” must be pretty universal.

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5 thoughts on “The Grasshopper King, wordled

  1. muraii says:

    If I had no idea (and I have only very little), based solely on this Wordlizing, I’d expect that The Grasshopper King was a dialog-heavy story about two woman, and either a nice chap named Higgs, or an ephemeral boson.

  2. nichole says:

    Beautiful! My first thought: “Gee, that Higgs talks a lot.”

  3. JSE says:

    muraii: close! But there’s another male character, whose name doesn’t crack the Wordle because he’s the first-person narrator.

  4. Em says:

    That’s beautiful.
    I guess checkers weren’t mentioned as often as I remember.
    I’ll have to wordle Cary’s book when it’s done. What a cool sight.

  5. Dirty Davey says:

    Hmm.

    “I wonder if most prose fiction would come out looking pretty much alike, apart from the names of characters? The predominance of “said” must be pretty universal.”

    Not Gaddis. Dash-demarcated dialogue without names or other narrative intrusion.

    “But there’s another male character, whose name doesn’t crack the Wordle because he’s the first-person narrator.”

    It seems the Wordle algorithm excludes “I”–which a quick check of TGK shows is in fact used frequently. (“A”, “the”, “of”, and forms of “to be” also fail to appear in your picture. However, submitting a single test sentence showed all of the words, so it must be more complicated than simple exclusion of these words.)

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