Variations on three-term arithmetic progressions

Here are three functions.  Let N be an integer, and consider:

  •  G_1(N), the size of the largest subset S of 1..N containing no 3-term arithmetic progression;
  •  G_2(N), the largest M such that there exist subsets S,T of 1..N with |S| = |T| = M such that the equation s_i + t_i = s_j + t_k has no solutions with (j,k) not equal to (i,i).  (This is what’s called  a tri-colored sum-free set.)
  • G_3(N), the largest M such that the following is true: given subsets S,T of 1..N, there always exist subsets S’ of S and T’ of T with |S’| + |T’| = M and S'+T \cup S+T' = S+T.

You can see that G_1(N) <= G_2(N) <= G_3(N).  Why?  Because if S has no 3-term arithmetic progression, we can take S = T and s_i = t_i, and get a tri-colored sum-free set.  Now suppose you have a tri-colored sum-free set (S,T) of size M; if S’ and T’ are subsets of S and T respectively, and S'+T \cup S+T' = S+T, then for every pair (s_i,t_i), you must have either s_i in S’ or t_i in T’; thus |S’| + |T’| is at least M.

When the interval 1..N is replaced by the group F_q^n, the Croot-Lev-Pach-Ellenberg-Gijswijt argument shows that G_1(F_q^n) is bounded above by the number of monomials of degree at most (q-1)n/3; call this quantity M(F_q^n).  In fact, G_3(F_q^n) is bounded above by M(F_q^n), too (see the note linked from this post) and the argument is only a  modest extension of the proof for G_1.  For all we know, G_1(F_q^n) might be much smaller, but Kleinberg has recently shown that G_2(F_2^n) (whence also G_3(F_2^n)) is equal to M(F_2^n) up to subexponential factors, and work in progress by Kleinberg and Speyer has shown this for several more q and seems likely to show that the bound is tight in general.  On the other hand, I have no idea whether to think G_1(F_q^n) is actually equal to M(F_q^n); i.e. is the bound proven by me and Dion sharp?

The behavior of G_1(N) is, of course, very much studied; we know by Behrend (recently sharpened by Elkin) that G_1(N) is at least N/exp(c sqrt(log N)).  Roth proved that G_1(N) = o(N), and the best bounds, due to Tom Sanders, show that G_1(N) is O(N(log log N)^5 / log N).  (Update:  Oops, no!  Thomas Bloom has an upper bound even a little better than Sanders, change that 5 to a 4.)

What about G_2(N) and G_3(N)?  I’m not sure how much people have thought about these problems.  But if, for instance, you could show (for example, by explicit constructions) that G_3(N) was closer to Sanders than to Behrend/Elkin, it would close off certain strategies for pushing the bound on G_1(N) downward. (Update:  Jacob Fox tells me that you can get an upper bound for G_2(N) of order N/2^{clog* N} from his graph removal paper, applied to the multicolored case.)

Do we think that G_2(N) and G_3(N) are basically equal, as is now known to be the case for F_q^n?

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5 thoughts on “Variations on three-term arithmetic progressions

  1. Gil Kalai says:

    Dear Jordan, Fascinating questions. What is known for them in term of upper bounds?

  2. JSE says:

    Just added comment by way of Jacob Fox concerning an upper bound for G_2(N). About G_3(N) I have no idea.

  3. Gil Kalai says:

    We can ask these questions also for Z_p^n equiped with Nets Katz’ addition (see link below) which is an intermidiate version of addition for p-ary integers between the “nim” addition (addition in Z_p^n) and ordinary addition (of q-ary numbers) over the integers.

    https://gilkalai.wordpress.com/2016/05/17/polymath-10-emergency-post-5-the-erdos-szemeredi-sunflower-conjecture-is-now-proven/#comment-24602

  4. […] update on this post, where I listed three variations on the problem of finding large subsets of an abelian group A with […]

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